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Why Modi Government is Answerable on Pulwama & Balakot

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Indian constitution compels governments to be answerable towards citizen of the country. They can’t run away. Parliament question hours, parliamentary committees, auditors, parliamentary review of audit reports, and much more are nurtured to make them accountable towards the nation. And even armed forces are answerable to people of country.

It is human nature to avoid facing hard situations, hard questions, and ultimately making ourselves far away from course-correction.

It seems similar to governments across the world, they also want to avoid or divert hard questions asked to them. On Pulwama terror attack, Balakot air strike, and whole matter of national security; Indian government seems not ready to take hard questions, neither from opposition parties nor citizens of the country. They are cleverly diverting questions asked to them in such as way that it looks like opposition parties and citizens of country are questioning ability of armed forces.

If 1999 or 2000 was like today’s (2019) India, then we might not be able to understand mistakes of government and army during Kargil war. That time our soldiers fought for the nation with ultimate courage and bravery, so as our democracy which soul is asking questions.

Post Kargil what happened in India was exemplary, as Indian we must proud on that again and again. To enquiry on Kargil, Then Atal Bihari Vajpayee government made a committee. This was not a government committee, but with the order of cabinet secretary they had shown even ultra sensitive documents.

This committee was headed by multidimensional officer and strategic specialist K.Subrahmanyam. Who enquired and asked questions to then and former Prime Ministers, Defence Ministers, Foreign Ministers, and even former President of India. The K.Subrahmanyam committee report exposed dangerous mistakes of security, failed intelligence network, and poor army preparations.

If it is even 2017 then even we would not be able to know that our defense equipment are not enough to handle a war of more than ten days. CAG audit of 2015 was similar to it. Even if it was 1989, then you might have seen a similar weak-report like rafale on bofors.

No one questions war strategy from army and security forces. But, who says army can’t be asked in democracy? Even army strategic decisions made under cabinet’s defense committee in presence of chiefs of army, air force and navy.

Indian constitution compels governments to be answerable towards citizen of the country. They can’t run away. Parliament question hours, parliamentary committees, auditors, parliamentary review of audit reports, and much more are nurtured to make them accountable towards the nation. And even armed forces are answerable to people of country.

Financial accountability is the most important thing in the democracy. It is the budget for army that passed from the parliament that depends on either tax or loan taken by government. So there is system to audit army expense, some of them shown to parliament and ultra-sensitive others are kept secret.

It is not Pakistan where you can’t ask questions to security forces, in India they do show all calculation of budget and expenses. If there are mistakes, then questions are asked. Even in army corruption happens, and inquiry as well.

In democracy, decisions and accountability are institutional, not personal. Sometime politics make a person the whole institution that is dangerous. That’s why wise leaders try to make strong institutions which would be able to handle accountability and works on course-correction.

There had been politics on Kargil war. There was debate in parliament on it. People were saying that it is an attempt to making security forces weaker. But probably then democracy was more aware, that’s why government invited inquiry on security forces and own agencies. They accepted dangerous mistakes done by them. And then and following government worked on K.Subrahmanyam committee report and implemented recommendations to make “Good Intelligence Network” and “Well Preparedness”.

No matter how brave you are, in democracy you must be sensible. Avoiding questions are inviting risks. We don’t want to know what the mistakes of Indian agencies that are why Pulwama, Uri or Pathankot happened.

Politicians have Y, Z, and a lot of plus securities. It is common man who remains under threat. It is army man who dies in battle. In democracy asking questions is the biggest patriotism, because it is the best armor that we citizens can wear.

Author: Ajeet Chaubey

When he was born, parents lost his Janmpatri (sacred birth document). Since then, he has been writing and erasing his own destiny.


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